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Saxon Curriculum

Saxon Math
Math K Nancy Larson (©1994)

Kindergartners will build skills including oral counting; recognizing and sequencing numbers; identifying ordinal position; acting out addition and subtraction stories; counting with one-to-one correspondence; sorting; patterning; graphing real objects and pictures; identifying and counting pennies, dimes, and nickels; identifying one half; identifying shapes; covering and replicating geometric designs; measuring using nonstandard units of measure; telling time to the hour; and using a calendar. Individual oral assessments are built into the program.

(112 lessons)
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Math 1 Nancy Larson (©1994)

Grade 1 children will skip count by 1ís, 2ís, 5ís, and 10ís; compare and order numbers; identify ordinal position to tenth; identify a sorting rule; identify and extend patterns; solve routine and non-routine problems; master all basic addition facts and most of the basic subtraction facts; add two-digit numbers without regrouping; picture and name fractions; measure using inches, feet, and centimeters; compare volume, mass, and area; tell time to the half hour; count pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters; identify and draw polygons; identify geometric solids; tally; and create, read, and write observations from real graphs, pictographs, and bar graphs.

(130 lessons)
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Math 2 Nancy Larson (©1994)

Grade 2 children will skip count by 1ís, 2ís, 3ís, 4ís, 5ís, 10ís, 25ís, and 100ís; compare and order numbers; identify ordinal position to tenth; identify sorting and patterning rules; solve routine and non-routine problems; master all basic addition and subtraction facts; master multiplication facts to 5; add and subtract two-digit numbers; picture and name fractions; measure to the nearest half inch, centimeter, and foot; compare volume; compare and measure mass; measure perimeter and area; tell time to five-minute intervals; count pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters; identify geometric solids; identify lines of symmetry; identify angles; tally; and create, read, and write observations from real graphs, pictographs, bar graphs, Venn diagrams, and line graphs.

(132 lessons)
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Math 3 Nancy Larson (©1994)

Grade 3 children use simulations and games to learn and practice new concepts. Social studies and science connections are stressed. Children will skip count by whole numbers; compare and order numbers; identify place value; identify ordinal position to twentieth; identify and complete patterns; solve routine and non-routine problems; master all basic addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division facts; add and subtract multi-digit numbers; multiply a multi-digit number by a single-digit number; divide by single-digit divisors; add positive and negative numbers; picture, name, and order fractions; add and subtract fractions with common denominators; measure to the nearest quarter inch, millimeter, foot, and yard; identify the volume of standard containers; compare and measure mass; measure perimeter and area; tell time to the minute; determine elapsed time; count money; make change for a dollar; identify angles; identify lines of symmetry; identify function rules; graph ordered pairs on a coordinate graph; tally; and create, read, and write observations from real graphs, pictographs, bar graphs, Venn diagrams, and line graphs.

(140 lessons)
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Math 54 Stephen Hake and John Saxon (2nd ed. ©1995)

Math 54 (second edition) contains a thorough review of concepts and procedures related to whole number operations, including single-digit multiplication and division. Word problems are incrementally developed and continually practiced throughout the year. Math 54 is a balanced, integrated mathematics program that includes continual development of whole number concepts, whole number computation, mental math, problem solving, patterns and functions, measurement, geometry, fractions, decimals, statistics, and probability. The student edition contains no answers; an answer key is provided.

(141 lessons) 
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Math 65 Stephen Hake and John Saxon (2nd ed. ©1995)

Math 65 (second edition) reviews and expands all of the mathematical content from Math 54 in an integrated basic mathematics course. The emphasis on problem solving continues as students are called upon to apply mathematical tools and techniques to real mathematical situations through word problems. Math 65 includes whole number concepts and computation, mental computation, patterns and functions, measurement, and statistics and probability. Work with fractions, mixed numbers, decimals, and geometry is significantly expanded. Students are introduced to percentages and negative numbers. The student edition contains no answers; an answer key is provided.

(140 lessons)
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Math 76 Stephen Hake and John Saxon (3rd ed. ©1997)

Math 76 (third edition) reinforces the basic mathematical concepts and skills that students learned in Math 54 and Math 65. Concepts, procedures, and vocabulary that students will need in order to be successful in upper-level algebra and geometry courses are introduced and continually practiced. Students learn to simplify expressions containing parentheses as the first step to solving multi-step equations. They are introduced to exponents; square roots; geometric formulas; and adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing signed numbers. Math 76 students work extensively with ratios, percentages, fractions, mixed numbers, and decimals. Daily mental math and problem-solving exercises enhance studentsí repertoire of skills and increase their mathematical power. The student edition contains no answers; an answer key is provided.

(138 lessons)
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Math 87 Stephen Hake and John Saxon (1st ed. ©1997)

Math 87 (first edition) is a transition program for students who have completed Math 76 but are not ready to begin pre algebra. Basic mathematical concepts and skills are reviewed and reinforced. Concepts, procedures, and vocabulary needed to succeed in upper-level mathematics courses are introduced and developed incrementally with continual practice.Math 87 includes the study of fractions, decimals, percents, and ratios; perimeter, circumference, area, and volume; and exponents, scientific notation, and signed numbers. Students continually practice problem-solving techniques through word problems. The student edition contains no answers; an answer key is provided.

(135 lessons) 
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Algebra 1/2 John Saxon (2nd ed. ©1997)

Algebra 1/2 (second edition) covers all topics normally taught in pre algebra as well as additional topics from geometry and discrete mathematics. It is recommended for use by seventh graders who plan to take first-year algebra in the eighth grade, or by eighth graders who plan to take first-year algebra in the ninth grade. Algebra 1/2 represents the culmination of the study of pre algebra mathematics. Students   completing the program should be well-versed in the following areas: fractions, decimals, mixed numbers, signed numbers, numbers in base 2, arithmetic operations involving all these forms of  numbers, order of operations, percents, proportions, ratios, divisibility, rounding, place value, unit conversions, scientific notation, and word problems involving these pre algebraic concepts. Students are introduced to rudimentary algebra topics such as the evaluation of algebraic expressions, the simplification of algebraic expressions, and the solution of linear equations in one unknown. Also included are geometric concepts and topics such as perimeter, area, surface area, volume, classification of geometric figures and solids, geometric constructions, and symmetry. The student edition contains answers to odd numbered problems; an answer key with all answers is provided.

(137 lessons) 
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Algebra 1 John Saxon (3rd ed. ©1997)

Algebra 1 (third edition) covers topics typically treated in a first-year algebra course. Specific topics include arithmetic and evaluation of expressions involving signed numbers, exponents and roots, properties of real numbers, absolute value and equations and inequalities involving absolute value, scientific notation, unit conversions, solution of equations in one unknown and solution of simultaneous equations, the algebra of polynomials and rational expressions, word problems requiring algebra for the solution (such as uniform motion and coin problems), graphical solution of simultaneous equations, Pythagorean theorem, algebraic proofs, functional notation and functions, solution of quadratic equations by factoring and completing the square, direct and inverse variation, exponential growth, computation of the perimeter and area of two-dimensional regions, computation of the surface area and volume of a wide variety of geometric solids, and statistics and probability. The student edition contains answers to odd numbered problems; an answer key with all answers is provided.

(120 lessons) 
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Algebra 2 John Saxon (2nd ed. ©1997)

Algebra 2 (second edition) not only treats topics that are traditionally covered in second-year algebra but also covers a considerable amount of geometry. Specific algebra topics covered include the following: graphical solution of simultaneous equations, scientific notation, radicals, roots of quadratic equations including complex roots, properties of real numbers, inequalities and systems of inequalities, logarithms and antilogarithms, exponential equations, basic trigonometric functions, algebra of polynomials, vectors, polar and rectangular coordinate systems, and a wide spectrum of algebraic word problems. Time is spent developing geometric concepts and writing proof outlines. Students completing Algebra 2 will have studied the equivalent of one semester of informal geometry. Applications to other subjects such as physics and chemistry, as well as "real-world" problems, are covered, including gas law, force vector, chemical mixture, and percent markups. Set theory, probability and statistics, and other topics are also included. The student edition contains answers to odd numbered problems; an answer key with all answers is provided.

(129 lessons)
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Advanced Mathematics John Saxon (2nd ed. ©1996)

In Advanced Mathematics (second edition), topics from algebra, geometry, trigonometry, discrete mathematics, and mathematical analysis are interwoven to form a fully integrated text. Specific topics covered in the text include permutations and combinations, trigonometric identities, inverse trigonometric functions, conic sections, graphs of sinusoids, rectangular and polar representation of complex numbers, De Moivreís theorem, matrices and determinants, the binomial theorem, and the rational roots theorem. A rigorous treatment of Euclidean geometry is also presented. Word problems are developed throughout the problem sets and become progressively more elaborate. The graphing calculator is used to graph functions and perform data analysis. Conceptually-oriented problems that prepare students for college entrance exams (such as the ACT and SAT) are included in the problem sets. The student edition contains answers to odd numbered problems; an answer key with all answers is provided.

(125 lessons)
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Calculus John Saxon and Frank Wang (1st ed. ©1997)

Calculus treats all the topics normally covered in an Advanced Placement AB-level calculus program, as well as many from a BC-level program. The text begins with a review of those mathematical concepts and skills required for calculus. In the early problem sets, students practice setting up word problems they will later encounter as calculus problems. The problem sets contain multiple-choice and conceptually - oriented problems similar to those found on the Advanced Placement examination. Whenever possible, students are provided an intuitive introduction to concepts prior to a rigorous examination of them. Proofs are provided for all important theorems. For example, three proofs, one intuitive and two rigorous, are given for the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Numerous applications to physics, chemistry, engineering, and business are also treated in both the lessons and the problem sets. Use of this text has allowed students to take the Advanced Placement examination and score well. The student edition contains answers to odd numbered problems; an answer key with all answers is provided. 

(117 lessons)
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Physics   John Saxon (1st ed. ©1993)

Physics was written with both average and gifted students in mind. The subject is taught at an introductory level, allowing the average high school student to grasp the concepts of Newtonís laws, statics, dynamics, thermodynamics, optics, dc circuits, waves, electromagnetics, and special relativity. The topics are covered to a depth appropriate for college students majoring in non-engineering disciplines. Consequently, gifted students who use this book will have great success with the Advanced Placement physics examination and average students who are willing to do the homework will also be able to pass the examination. This book does not require that the teacher have a background in physics. Any teacher who has taught second year algebra, especially Saxonís Algebra 2, can teach this book successfully. Topics from the Advanced Placement Level B Exam can be covered before the exam is given in early May. The student edition contains answers to odd numbered problems; an answer key with all answers is provided.

(100 lessons)
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Saxon Phonics

Phonics K Lorna Simmons (©1998)
Phonics K begins by working with auditory discrimination skills to see if the child is aware of different sounds of the English language, indicating readiness to learn to read. When the child is ready, the sound, name, and written form of each letter is taught. In order to provide plenty of time for practice, one week is devoted to each letter. When a new letter is taught, the child reviews all previously taught letters to ensure sufficient exposure to and mastery of each letter. After learning three letters, the child begins to blend sounds to create words and unblend words to spell. The child is never asked to read or write with sounds that have not been taught. Oral assessments are included to monitor progress. Games and activities are provided for remediation and motivation. 

Phonics K Teaching Tools (packaged in Home Study Kit with Student Materials and Teacherís Manual)

(140 lessons) 
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Phonics 1 Lorna Simmons (©1998)

Phonics 1 begins by teaching a new letter or letter cluster every day, then reviewing those letters for as long as necessary. The first-grader learns two letters, then begins blending sounds to read and unblending words to spell. As the child progresses, he or she is given small books (readers) that contain words to blend. Comprehension and spelling tests are provided to monitor progress. Games and activities are also provided for remediation and motivation. Each day the child reviews all previous learning and is given an additional worksheet for continued reinforcement. Spelling rules are taught so that the child learns to spell by using knowledge instead of memorization only. Common suffixes and a few prefixes are taught. 

Phonics 1 Teaching Tools (packaged in Home Study Kit with Student Materials and Teacherís Manual)

(140 lessons) 
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Phonics 2 Lorna Simmons (©1998)

Phonics 2 begins with a quick review of vowels and consonants and then moves to decoding and reading comprehension. The second-grader reviews all situations covered in Phonics 1, then is exposed to higher levels of comprehension (through the presentation of factual as well as fictional content), harder spelling words, higher-level vocabulary, and an in-depth study of prefixes and suffixes. The child is also presented with information regarding the history of the English language. As in Phonics 1, comprehension and spelling tests are provided to monitor progress, and games and activities are provided for remediation and motivation. Worksheets are provided for continual reinforcement. 

Phonics 2 Teaching Tools (packaged in Home Study Kit with Student Materials and Teacherís Manual)

(140 lessons) 
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